Tag Archives: Naval Aviation

Index – The Best of Neptunus Lex

On March 6, 2012 we lost Lex. He died doing what he wanted to do, teaching Naval Aviators how to be even better.

For many of us, the Lexicans, he became more than just a blogger but a friend.  Carroll “Lex” LeFon not only enjoyed writing, but he enjoyed the interaction of the “commentariat”, many of whom he called “the best friends I never met”.

Soon after his accident, his website, Neptunus Lex, went down. If it weren’t for the foresight of one Lexican, who copied and pasted most (about 70%) of his posts, “the lightness of Lex”, all 9  years’ worth of his work, would have disappeared into the digital ether.

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Filed under Best of Neptunus Lex, by lex, Carroll "Lex" LeFon, Carroll LeFon, FA-18, Fighter Pilot Stories, Flying, Funny Stuff, Humor, hunting trips, Index, Lex, Lexicans, Naval Aviation, Naval History, Navy, Neptunus Lex, Night Bounce

A true hero has flown West

Nels Tanner died last week and will be buried in Covington, Tennessee on June 16th.

Maybe you don’t know about Nels.

Here’s his story.
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Hero of Vietnam War, Cmdr. Nels Tanner, dies

Cmdr. Charles Nels Tanner, 82, a hero of the Vietnam War and Covington, Tenn., native, who endured torture at the hands of the Vietcong in the dreaded Hanoi Hilton during his six and a half years of captivity, died today in Florida.

Patriot Park in Covington was created to honor his legacy of service and valor. He is survived by his wife Sara Ann. The family is coming to Covington to make funeral arrangements over the weekend. He is expected to be buried in Mt. Carmel Cemetery.

Tanner was tortured while imprisoned, including having his shoulders pulled from their sockets until he couldn’t use his arms. He proved to be an embarrassment for the Vietcong leaders, noting in a written confession for war crimes that he recalled two pilots would not bomb innocent civilians, a Lt. Clark Kent, the alter ego of the character Superman, and Lt. Ben Casey, a television character who was a surgeon and the centerpiece of a medical drama at the time.

Tanner’s confession was released and a Japanese journalist was brought in to interview him and another prisoner of war. While talking to the Japanese journalist, they deliberately stuffed their mouths with food in the manner of famished men to imply to the journalist that they were starving (in fact, living on a diet of soup, they nearly were). The interview also proved terribly embarrassing for the Vietcong leaders.

Once the interview was released and the confession was revealed to be a fake, Tanner endured more torture at the hands of his captors.

His grit and unbreakable spirit in the face of that kind of torture led to Tanner being called one of the “Alcatraz Eleven” or the “Alcatraz Gang,” names used by the U.S. media to describe 11 high-level captives in the Hanoi Hilton as being unbreakable by the enemy and who were noted as being leaders of a resistance movement. The name came from making an association with the toughest prison in Vietnam and the infamous U.S. prison off the coast of San Francisco.

Born in 1932 and raised in Covington, Nels Tanner entered the Aviation Cadet Program in the U.S. Navy in 1953. The next year, he graduated as an Ensign and later that year was designated as a Naval Aviator. For his first assignment, he was stationed in Alameda, Calif., and he remained there until 1959 when he went to Moffett Field, Calif., where he eventually served as an F-8 Crusader instructor pilot. By mid-1960, he was in Miramar, Calif., and was stationed there until 1965 when he was deployed to Southeast Asia.

While flying missions there, he was shot down and taken as a prisoner of war on Oct. 9, 1966.

He spent 2,339 days in captivity, nearly six and a half years, before he was released during Operation Homecoming on March 4, 1973, when he returned to the Naval Air Station in Millington after spending some time recovering from injuries.

His last assignment was as the Chief of Staff of Foreign Training in Pensacola, Fla. He retired from his storied career on Oct. 1, 1985.

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Rest in peace, Commander. We salute you.

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Shayne Meder and the Team finished the MH-60

The Best Looking Helo Paint Scheme Ever.

The Scorpions CAG Bird is finished.

Shayne with HSM-49 CO Bobby Brown

Shayne Meder with the Scorpions CO, CDR Bobby Brown. I do believe the Skipper is very happy with the results.

Scorpion 100 Bureau Number Scorpion 100 Dog House Scorpion 100 nose Scorpion 100 tail 1 Scorpion 100 tail 2 Scorpion 100 tail 3 Scorpion 100 tail 4 Scorpion 100 tail 5 Shayne Scott Jim Shayne with gun in hand

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Hizzoner’s Last Flight

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There’s something that you’ll want to go read over at I don’t know; ask the skipper:

It wasn’t necessarily his last flight evah. It was his last flight in that particular tour of duty, in that squadron, on that boat. Then again, there was certainly no guarantee of another sea-based sortie. This fella – if I remember the callsign correctly – we will refer to as Tex from this point forward. His call sign sounded similar. It might have even rhymed.

Go read the rest.

Make sure to add the blog to you daily read too. Lots of great stuff there.

What a great way to hang up the spurs.

 

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Filed under Airplanes, Good Stuff, Leadership, Lex, Lexicans, Naval Aviation, Navy, WWLD

Infographic: U.S. Navy Fighters 1917 – 2010

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by | April 30, 2014 · 1:50 pm

Cutaway Thursday: E-2D Advanced Hawkeye

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Learn more here.

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Filed under Aeronautical Engineering, Airplanes, Naval Aviation, Navy, Plane Pr0n

USS Enterprise CVN-65 by Gabriel Suranyi

http://www.carrierbuilders.net/gallery/20070318_USS_Enterprise_1-72/20070318_USS_Enterprise_1-72.htm

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