Tag Archives: Naval Aviation

Flying With Spike

Flying With Spike

Hard to believe it has been 27 years since Navy Captain  Michael “Spike” Scott Speicher disappeared with his FA-18 over Iraq. In my reposting of Lex’s posts, a few days ago I reposted his news of finding his remains in 2009.

 

I am sure that had Lex come across this post by Kevin Miller, he would have linked it. But alas, it was just written a few days ago. He tells us the kind of man Spike was.

H/T to spill.

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Filed under FA-18, GWOT, Iraq, Naval Aviation, Naval History

A Famous Find Within A Famous Find

A Find Within A Find

Paul Allen’s Team discovering the wreck of the Lexington  a few days ago was exciting enough. But now they found a rather famous Wildcat in the debris field.

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Filed under Naval Aviation, Naval History

Notes on an anniversary

BigDayTomorrow1

When I started reading Lex – as noted in my  premature  epilogue, I mentioned that Lex considered all of his readers to be his friends, unless proven otherwise.  I say “premature” because I felt I would just do  a quick scan of the Wayback Archives, and that would be the end of my self-imposed task to put Lex “back out there “.

I expected to find a few posts not already in our own archives and  reestablish his Internet presence in the world. After all, what more could we find that we didn’t already have?

Plenty, as it turned out. One thing that amazed me about Lex was not that he was so prolific – lots of writers are prolific and many write “filler” with hopefully a few gems.

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Filed under Carroll "Lex" LeFon, Carroll LeFon, Lex, Naval Aviation, Neptunus Lex

Good Article From A Former C2 Driver

It’s a long read, but parts are humorous, parts show you the “fun” of flying such an old (50,000 hours) plane that is so critical for carrier operations.

H/T to comjam.

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Filed under Naval Aviation, Uncategorized

Index – The Best of Neptunus Lex

On March 6, 2012 we lost Lex. He died doing what he wanted to do, teaching Naval Aviators how to be even better.

IndexTheBestOfNeptunusLex

Lex as a TOPGUN Instructor

For many of us, the Lexicans, he became more than just a blogger but a friend.  Carroll “Lex” LeFon not only enjoyed writing, but he enjoyed the interaction of the “commentariat”, many of whom he called “the best friends I never met”.

Soon after his accident, his website, Neptunus Lex, went down. If it weren’t for one Lexican, who copied and pasted most (about 70%) of his posts for later reading, “the lightness of Lex”, all 9  years’ worth of his work, would have been gone forever. Since this “Best of index has gotten so big, I have built another secondary index (Rest of ) And there’s over 1,000 of his posts not indexed.

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Filed under Best of Neptunus Lex, by lex, Carroll "Lex" LeFon, Carroll LeFon, FA-18, Fighter Pilot Stories, Flying, Funny Stuff, Humor, Index, Lex, Lexicans, Naval Aviation, Naval History, Navy, Neptunus Lex, Night Bounce

A true hero has flown West

Nels Tanner died last week and will be buried in Covington, Tennessee on June 16th.

Maybe you don’t know about Nels.

Here’s his story.
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Hero of Vietnam War, Cmdr. Nels Tanner, dies

Cmdr. Charles Nels Tanner, 82, a hero of the Vietnam War and Covington, Tenn., native, who endured torture at the hands of the Vietcong in the dreaded Hanoi Hilton during his six and a half years of captivity, died today in Florida.

Patriot Park in Covington was created to honor his legacy of service and valor. He is survived by his wife Sara Ann. The family is coming to Covington to make funeral arrangements over the weekend. He is expected to be buried in Mt. Carmel Cemetery.

Tanner was tortured while imprisoned, including having his shoulders pulled from their sockets until he couldn’t use his arms. He proved to be an embarrassment for the Vietcong leaders, noting in a written confession for war crimes that he recalled two pilots would not bomb innocent civilians, a Lt. Clark Kent, the alter ego of the character Superman, and Lt. Ben Casey, a television character who was a surgeon and the centerpiece of a medical drama at the time.

Tanner’s confession was released and a Japanese journalist was brought in to interview him and another prisoner of war. While talking to the Japanese journalist, they deliberately stuffed their mouths with food in the manner of famished men to imply to the journalist that they were starving (in fact, living on a diet of soup, they nearly were). The interview also proved terribly embarrassing for the Vietcong leaders.

Once the interview was released and the confession was revealed to be a fake, Tanner endured more torture at the hands of his captors.

His grit and unbreakable spirit in the face of that kind of torture led to Tanner being called one of the “Alcatraz Eleven” or the “Alcatraz Gang,” names used by the U.S. media to describe 11 high-level captives in the Hanoi Hilton as being unbreakable by the enemy and who were noted as being leaders of a resistance movement. The name came from making an association with the toughest prison in Vietnam and the infamous U.S. prison off the coast of San Francisco.

Born in 1932 and raised in Covington, Nels Tanner entered the Aviation Cadet Program in the U.S. Navy in 1953. The next year, he graduated as an Ensign and later that year was designated as a Naval Aviator. For his first assignment, he was stationed in Alameda, Calif., and he remained there until 1959 when he went to Moffett Field, Calif., where he eventually served as an F-8 Crusader instructor pilot. By mid-1960, he was in Miramar, Calif., and was stationed there until 1965 when he was deployed to Southeast Asia.

While flying missions there, he was shot down and taken as a prisoner of war on Oct. 9, 1966.

He spent 2,339 days in captivity, nearly six and a half years, before he was released during Operation Homecoming on March 4, 1973, when he returned to the Naval Air Station in Millington after spending some time recovering from injuries.

His last assignment was as the Chief of Staff of Foreign Training in Pensacola, Fla. He retired from his storied career on Oct. 1, 1985.

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Rest in peace, Commander. We salute you.

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Shayne Meder and the Team finished the MH-60

The Best Looking Helo Paint Scheme Ever.

The Scorpions CAG Bird is finished.

Shayne with HSM-49 CO Bobby Brown

Shayne Meder with the Scorpions CO, CDR Bobby Brown. I do believe the Skipper is very happy with the results.

Scorpion 100 Bureau Number Scorpion 100 Dog House Scorpion 100 nose Scorpion 100 tail 1 Scorpion 100 tail 2 Scorpion 100 tail 3 Scorpion 100 tail 4 Scorpion 100 tail 5 Shayne Scott Jim Shayne with gun in hand

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Filed under Really Good Stuff