WW2 History Rarely Seen

I just finished an excellent series, shown on Netflix, Greatest Events of World War II In Colour.

It is narrated by British actor Derek Jacobi, and has various historians and best-selling authors talking about the battles. 

One usually is presented with what I would call a one dimensional view of history. 

“This is what they thought, and this is why they planned so-and-so, and this was the result.”

In many of these episodes, I have gotten viewpoints that I had never heard before.

What was Herman Goering’s biggest weakness in the Luftwaffe that denied him victory at the Battle of Britain?

 Who were the proponents and opponents in the American government over use of the atomic bomb, and what were the Japanese preparations to ensure the Americans would sue for peace? What were the geopolitical implications over using it vs not using it?

This is the only time I have heard on the subject the preparation for Operation Downfall and the Japanese response,  and who in the Japanese war cabinet was for surrender and who was against surrender even after the two bombs were dropped.

And who in the American cabinet of President Truman was against it and who for it?

Even in episodes like Midway, where I learned nothing new, historians and authors put it into such detail that you know exactly why every decision was made.

The episodes include:

Blitzkrieg

Battle of Britain

Pearl Harbor

Battle of Midway

Siege of Stalingrad

D Day

Battle of the Bulge

Dresden firestorm

Liberation of Buchenwald

Hiroshima

 

Well worth your time. 

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Filed under History, Naval History

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