The College Cheating Scandal

What has surprised me is not the cheating – there have always been those who have cheated to gain an advantage – but the depth of this scandal. And it was in 2 forms. Someone would take the entrance exams for the applicant, and that person would bribe those who administered the tests to allow this fraud.

Singer arranged for a third-party — usually Mark Riddell — to take the test secretly in the students’ place or replace their responses with his own….

…Igor Dvorskiy, who administered SAT and ACT tests in Los Angeles, and Lisa “Niki” Williams, who administered the tests at a public high school in Houston, are both accused of accepting bribes to allow Riddell to take the tests. Both are charged with conspiracy to commit racketeering.  

Or, college coaches were bribed to produce fake athletic credentials.

While college coaches don’t explicitly decide who gets accepted into their universities, they do make recommendations on which recruited athletes should be accepted…

…(Lori) Loughlin, who played Aunt Becky on “Full House,” and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, allegedly agreed to pay bribes totaling $500,000 to have their two daughters designated as recruits to the University of Southern California crew team.

But neither of Loughlin’s daughters ever competed in crew, a complaint states.

Singer is also accused of bribing college coaches and athletic officials to say a prospective student should be accepted because the student was a recruit for their sports team. But Singer and the coaches knew that the student was not a competitive player, and that his or her athletic profile was fake, an indictment said.

I am proud of a few things in my life – wearing the uniform of the U.S. Army, if only as an E-4, and coming from a school that placed honor above everything. The first thing every new student would do upon orientation is sign a statement acknowledging that cheating would be grounds for expulsion.

It was “either / or”. There were no levels of punishment.  Even writing a bad check would be grounds for expulsion.

In one incident, that latter fact probably kept me out of a Virginia county jail for a few days.

Our exams were always written in a blue booklet, with the following signed handwritten statement at the first page:

“On my honor as a student I have neither given nor received information on this exam”. 

 

I have told people in subsequent years that my grades indicated a perfectly honest behavior.

To cheat in life, gaining an advantage over your fellow man indicates an emptiness of the soul.

A relative of mine, who has always been very focused and applied, was turned down by Stanford some years ago. Despite having a 4.0 average.

She went on to another school and today is a Marketing MBA – a buyer – for a major corporation. She probably decided to stock some things you have bought. Got her MBA at a night school while raising 2 children. And even budgeted her money to avoid loans.

You can’t keep good people down.

While good people won’t be discouraged by setbacks – they keep going – I wonder if she – and how many others who led honorable lives – have been denied admission by those not honorable by these schools.

One has to look at themselves every day. Apparently what some see doesn’t bother them.

One has to wonder if this is only the “tip of the iceberg”.

One cannot say that the admitted students are innocent – they were aware of the dishonest advantages they received getting them in the school.

My question is, should they be expelled?

 

2 Comments

Filed under Life, Politics and Culture

2 responses to “The College Cheating Scandal

  1. Brian

    Watch the school administrations.

  2. Pingback: A Good Question | The Lexicans

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